What is Corneal Transplant or Keratoplasty ?


Corneal transplant, also known as Keratoplasty of Corneal grafting, is a surgical procedure where a damaged or diseased cornea is replaced by donated corneal tissue. The graft is taken from a recently dead individual who had pledged to donate his or her eyes. The graft replaces central corneal tissue, damaged due to disease or eye injury, with healthy corneal tissue donated from a local eye bank.

How is Corneal Transplant done?


During traditional corneal transplant surgery, a circular button-shaped, full-thickness section of tissue is removed from the diseased or injured cornea using either a surgical cutting instrument called a trephine. A matching size graft from the donor tissue is then positioned and sutured into place. The sutures (stitches) remain in place typically for a year or more after surgery.
Penetrating keratoplasty surgery generally takes one to two hours and most procedures are performed on an outpatient basis, meaning you can go home a short while after the surgery.

Who can become an eye donor?
Almost anyone can be an eye donor. Unlike organ donation, age and blood type does not affect donor suitability. Similarly, donor eye colour and eye sight are not barriers to donation.

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