What is LASIK?

laser-eye

LASIK is a type of refractive surgery for the correction of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. LASIK provides a permanent alternative to eyeglasses or contact lenses. LASIK starts with the creation of a thin flap in the cornea and then a laser is used to reshape the cornea to improve the way the eye focuses light rays onto the retina at the back of the eye.

How the LASIK done?

LASIK-eye-surgery

First, the eye is numbed with a few drops of topical anesthetic. An eyelid holder is placed between the eyelids to keep them open and prevent the patient from blinking. A suction ring placed on the eye lifts and flattens the cornea and helps keep the eye from moving. The patient may feel pressure from the eyelid holder and suction ring, similar to a finger pressed firmly on the eyelid.
Once the cornea is flattened, a hinged flap of corneal tissue is created using an automated microsurgical device, either a laser or blade. This corneal flap is lifted and folded back. Then the excimer laser pre-programmed with the patient’s unique eye measurements is centered above the eye. The patient looks at a special pinpoint light, called a fixation or target light, while the excimer laser sculpts the corneal tissue. Then the surgeon places the flap back into position and smoothes the edges. The corneal flap sticks to the underlying corneal tissue within two to five minutes, and stitches are not needed. The surgeon will provide eye drops to help the eye heal and relieve dryness. It may take three to six months after LASIK surgery for the improvements in a person’s vision to fully stabilize and any side effects to go away.

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